Privileged Influence


There is much to love about being a recruiter.  No one day is ever same.  For the recruiter at the desk, the opportunity to engage with businesses of every shape, size, sector, product means that every day is a learning experience.  Every candidate we meet has a unique combination of skills, experiences, aspirations, motivations, behaviours.  What other industry offers such diversity?

On a personal level, the opportunity to engage around the leadership table with the people who are shaping and transforming businesses means that on a weekly basis I get to add the latest module to my personal MBA, as I listen to the challenges those business leaders are facing.  I can’t fail but to learn from my experiences.

To have worked in this industry for the last 17 years has been a huge privilege.  Yes we get some bad press, the majority of which is caused by our own actions and behaviour, but I want to stand up for the part we should play in creating a thriving economy for all.

As Recruiters we have a huge opportunity to transform people’s lives.  I have sat with many a job seeker who has been at a really low ebb, disillusioned, de – motivated, disappointed in their place of work, with their circumstances and in many cases with their lives.  The desire to change their situation, the responsibility for that change has to come from the individual.  However the recruiter can play a huge part in affecting that change for the better.

If by finding out what makes that individual tick, their skills, talent, motivations, aspirations, we can find the right seat in the right company for them, it has a massive effect on their life, their happiness and potentially their wealth.  Get it wrong and the impact can be just as massive in a very negative way.

Think of the place the recruiter has to play in the creation of wealth.  Put the right person in the right business and that combination can transform the future of a company.  It can have a massive impact on the creation of jobs, wealth and opportunity for potentially large numbers of people.  This doesn’t just mean placing the person at the top.  The introduction of a trainee who thinks up a new product, process or service can have equally as positive an impact on a business.

It doesn’t matter who you are placing.  What matters is making sure you get it right.  If we don’t take this seriously, the damage can be severe.  If the job is done properly, our impact is immense.

As Recruiters, in most cases we don’t make the hiring decision.  The decision as to who to appoint or whether or not to take the job offer rests with the employer and potential employee.  We are simply the broker, the middleman, the conduit.  However our ability to influence should not be underestimated.

Many will accuse me of delusions of grandeur.  I make no apology.  The vast majority of us spend most of our waking time at work.  The responsibility for and, opportunity to, open doors for people who may not otherwise have been available to them is a huge privilege, something I take seriously and one of which I am immensely proud.

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2 Comments

Filed under agency, Careers, Hiring, Job Creation, Recruitment

2 responses to “Privileged Influence

  1. Brenda Riner

    Thank you for that personal look into the role of a recruiter. I for one know little about the recruiting business, but feel now more than ever their professionalism is appreciated by those of us in career transitions, and that they play an integral part in putting the right people together with the right companies.

  2. How nicely you’ve put into words what I’ve practiced in my business for 26 years.

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